Monthly Archives: November 2012

healthcare changes.

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I’m participating in WEGO Health’s National Health Blog Post Month (#NHBPM) during the month of November. I’ll be writing 30 posts in 30 days based on the prompts they supply. Learn more here. Wish me luck!

Today’s prompt: “I want to change THIS about healthcare…” (I’m focusing on this from an insurance perspective.)

I think I’ve said it before, but I’m suprisingly content with my current health insurance company. This hasn’t always been the case though, and I still have my fair share of problems. I can’t even count the number of hours I’ve spent on the phone with healthcare companies (and those related) figuring out bills, getting claims covered, etc. These are just a few of the things I would like to change about healthcare. Can they be done? Maybe. But I’m not a healthcare CEO, and these are just the dreams and wishes of a type 1 here in NC..

Simplify Things
Why do our deductibles, out of pocket maximums, co-pays and premiums have to be so confusing? Those of us using healthcare are not experts on your lingo and methods. It confuses the shit out of me when I’ve met my deductible but still have to pay ridiculous amounts of money for certain items because I haven’t spent my out of pocket maximum. Keep it simple, I’d rather not be prematurely grey.

Don’t Bully Us
Why do you deny claims, then later approve them after I put up a fight? It’s ridiculous. It’s bullying. There are people in this world that don’t realize denied claims can be appealed, and they get screwed out of SO much because they don’t fight for it. Why should we have to fight with you
to get our needs met?

Get Rid Of That Stupid Pre-Existing Conditions Clause
This one is pretty self explanatory. I will never be able to get health insurance without having a job that provides it without paying an arm and a leg. I have high hopes for this, though.
 
Stop Limiting Our Supplies
Why would you limit the number of strips or vials of insulin we can get in a month, just to save a little money now? News flash – you are just going to end up paying just as much or more later. We stay healthier and more motivated if we have the things we need to take care of ourselves. I don’t have enough strips to test whenever I want? Well, guess what – either I’m going to run my numbers a little high (which could mean you’ll be paying for my ER visit with DKA, or my complications later) or run them a little low (which could mean me passing out and needing to go to the hospital. or worse). I am lucky enough that I get the strips that I ask for, and I couldn’t be more thankful. But, I know this isn’t the case for everyone, and it makes me sick.

playlist.

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I’m participating in WEGO Health’s National Health Blog Post Month (#NHBPM) during the month of November. I’ll be writing 30 posts in 30 days based on the prompts they supply. Learn more here. Wish me luck!

Today’s prompt: “Health playlist. Make a playlist for your health community…”

So, this prompt caught my attention the first time I checked out the prompt list for NHBPM. I told myself I was going to start paying attention to the lyrics of songs so that I could have a bad ass playlist put together by the time this came around. Well, first of all – I’m posting a day late, so there’s that. And secondly, I only wrote down two songs. Bleh. So what I’ll do is post what I’ve come up with today, and add to it as I come across more. It’s a work in progress, guys, as is life.

Ben Taylor, Not Alone
Ben Taylor, Listening
Nick Jonas, A Little Bit Longer
The Beatles, With a Little Help From My Friends (for the record, getting high referencing high blood sugars, nothing illegal).

What songs would you add to a diabetes playlist?

wild hounds.

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I’m participating in WEGO Health’s National Health Blog Post Month (#NHBPM) during the month of November. I’ll be writing 30 posts in 30 days based on the prompts they supply. Learn more here. Wish me luck!

Today’s prompt: “Use a picture or video to inspire a post…”

I had a really fun dinner d-meetup tonight and I’m excited for the weekend, so life is good. Instead of inspiring an actual post, i’ll inspire a smile. Good for your health, right? These are my wild hounds.

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a short one on pharma and social media.

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I’m participating in WEGO Health’s National Health Blog Post Month (#NHBPM) during the month of November. I’ll be writing 30 posts in 30 days based on the prompts they supply. Learn more here. Wish me luck!

Today’s prompt: “Why healthcare companies (or healthcare professionals) should use social media…”

I’m going to rely on a few recent personal experiences for this one. To me, it seems only natural that pharmaceutical companies embrace social media. Healthcare professionals, though? I’m not quite sure. It seems like there would be a lot of red tape on that front.. as far as HIPAA laws and patient confidentiality and whatnot. I’m also not sure I’d want to tweet my doctor about my health. Just seems too wide open (oh, wait.. but I blog about my health! Just seems different).

The ways I’ve used social media recently to complain have a conversation with a couple of the medical companies I use. I’m happy to say that they both got back to me (either through tweets or direct messages) within a couple of hours, so I guess that’s something for companies to consider before jumping on the social media train.

I wouldn’t NOT use a healthcare company because they don’t use social media.. but it certainly does change my view of them. I feel  like it really establishes the fact that they are willing and able to have a conversation with their patients/customers in a very tech-friendly and convenient (to us) way. I appreciate the effort.

traveling with diabetes.

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I’m participating in WEGO Health’s National Health Blog Post Month (#NHBPM) during the month of November. I’ll be writing 30 posts in 30 days based on the prompts they supply. Learn more here. Wish me luck!

Today’s prompt: “Write about what it’s like to travel with your condition…”

I’m just getting back from a 4 day work conference, so traveling with diabetes is fresh on my mind. I’m also ridiculously behind on work, life, cleaning, blogging and sleeping – so once again, sorry!

For me, traveling with diabetes requires a lot of extra planning and a bit of extra attention during my trips.

I left for Greenville, NC on Sunday around noon. My co-workers were picking me up, so I had to be ready to go before they got to me. I packed everything on Saturday night. I’m not sure if it’s my nature, or if it’s diabetes nurture – but I’m a planner. Diabetes-wise, I packed:

  • My last box of VerioIQ strips
  • My VerioIQ meter (always with me)
  • A back-up meter and pricker in case I lost my Verio (or it was stolen, or it broke, or I lost the charger, etc.)
  • Strips for backup meter
  • Needles in case my pump breaks
  • 2 bottles of NovoLog (I’m always worried one will spoil or break)
  • A Lantus pen (in case my pump breaks)
  • One box of pump infusion sets
  • One box of pump reservoirs
  • Shooter to insert infusion set
  • Tegaderm
  • Alcohol swabs
  • SkinTac
  • Medical Adhesive (for taping down sites)
  • 2 AAA Batteries
  • A penny for battery changes
  • 2 Dexcom sensors
  • Dexcom and VerioIQ chargers
  • My big book o’ diabetes knowledge (current basal rates, emergency endo number, off-pump plan)
  • Glucagon
  • Extra Glucose
  • Carb free snacks (I was afraid all of our meals would be really carb heavy. Which isn’t necessarily a problem, but for me, lower carb keeps my sugars more stable)
  • Bottle of apple juice to keep in the room

That might actually be everything, aside from what I carry in my purse on a daily basis (if you’re really interested, you can see that here).

But, in addition to thinking about what to pack for my trip, there were other things to think about. Like the fact that Edgepark called me on Friday and told me my new shipment of strips would arrive while I was away (thank you, favorite neighbor who always brings in my packages while I’m gone!). Or that because I didn’t really have access to a vehicle the whole time, I had to make sure to bring extra sets and strips in my purse so that I wouldn’t be stranded with no ride back to the hotel. Or that at the Monday night dinner, the ONLY thing to drink (besides beer and wine) was sweet tea. REALLY!?! Or making sure that the hotel I booked had a fridge (recently stayed in one that didn’t have a fridge) to store my insulin. Or double checking that I have all the supplies I need on hand, and if not – refilling scripts and picking them up.

Luckily, my sugars were cooperative for the most part during this trip. That’s not always the case. The last vacation husband and I took, we were surprised to be staying at a place where a lot of families with kids were staying, too. We joked about how we were content at this point in our lives to not have kids to tend to while sipping margaritas at a restaurant.. when I realized that diabetes is a lot like our child. We need a babysitter, and a cure.